The Baltimore police department has found themselves in a bit of trouble thanks to body cameras. What did they do now? This is the forty-sixth episode of The LAVA Spurt, Baltimore Police Are On Crack.

Twice in two weeks, the Baltimore public defender's office has released police body camera footage showing police officers planting drugs at scenes and then finding them. The first time the actual act of planting the drugs was caught on the camera because the officer clearly missed the briefing where he was told that the cameras were always on record but, when the record button was pushed, it kept the 30 second prior to the time the button was pushed. In that 30-second window, the officer planted drugs in a back alley and then walked out to the street with his cop buddies. He then pushed the button to start the recording and proceeds to go search for the drugs that he happens to find exactly where his camera showed him planting them. Imagine that shit.

The second video shows officers allegedly placing drugs in a car. The officers searched the scene, they said, after they supposedly witnessed a drug deal. In the video, the officers are shown thoroughly searching a car — apparently finding nothing. The cameras are then turned off. But they turn on a bit later, showing an officer squatting by the car. After a while, the officer backs off. Then 30 seconds later, another cop searches the same spot the officer was squatting at, and — suddenly! — finds a bag of drugs.

As of August 2nd, 41 cases have been dropped because the credibility of these involved officers is now in question. Apparently, over a hundred more are being reviewed, all of which are criminal cases that would have relied on testimony from the three officers that have been caught red-handed framing innocent citizens. The cases that have been dismissed involved drug-related felonies and weapons possession.

One of the three officers has been suspended and the other two were placed on administrative duty. 

 

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The Baltimore police department has found themselves in a bit of trouble thanks to body cameras. What did they do now? Thank you for joining me on the forty-sixth episode of The LAVA Spurt, Baltimore Police Are On Crack.

Twice in two weeks, the Baltimore public defender's office has released police body camera footage showing police officers planting drugs at scenes and then finding them. The first time the actual act of planting the drugs was caught on the camera because the officer clearly missed the briefing where he was told that the cameras were always on record but, when the record button was pushed, it kept the 30 second prior to the time the button was pushed. In that 30-second window, the officer planted drugs in a back alley and then walked out to the street with his cop buddies. He then pushed the button to start the recording and proceeds to go search for the drugs that he happens to find exactly where his camera showed him planting them. Imagine that shit.

The second video shows officers allegedly placing drugs in a car. The officers searched the scene, they said, after they supposedly witnessed a drug deal. In the video, the officers are shown thoroughly searching a car — apparently finding nothing. The cameras are then turned off. But they turn on a bit later, showing an officer squatting by the car. After a while, the officer backs off. Then 30 seconds later, another cop searches the same spot the officer was squatting at, and — suddenly! — finds a bag of drugs.

As of August 2nd, 41 cases have been dropped because the credibility of these involved officers is now in question. Apparently, over a hundred more are being reviewed, all of which are criminal cases that would have relied on testimony from the three officers that have been caught red-handed framing innocent citizens. The cases that have been dismissed involved drug-related felonies and weapons possession.

One of the three officers has been suspended and the other two were placed on administrative duty. 

In one of the funniest things I've ever heard in my life. the Baltimore police commissioner, Ken Davis, said that it was possible the officers had found the bag of drugs in the alley and forgot to record it, so, they could have been reenacting the scene as it actually happened. What the actual fuck? If this mother fucker is really that stupid, it's no wonder he's a police commissioner. Clearly, it doesn't require a high IQ to be on the force and this guy fits right in.

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Body cameras began deployment in Baltimore in 2016. They have over 1,500 deployed now and they expect full deployment of 2,500 by early 2018. So, the way these things work is new to these officers. But get this shit. Police department T.J. Smith actually had the balls to say, "This is kind of a learning and trial period, right? I think that we're going to go through growing pains."  What? Are you fucking serious right now? A learning and trial period? He basically just said, "yep, we got caught, but we're still learning how to plant shit on people without getting caught with our new gizmos, so once we get through the learning period, we'll be right back to planting evidence without getting caught." Fuck this guy in the neck.

Another interesting part of this is that, in both instances, other cops are literally around watching this shit happens and never say a fucking word. In one case there are three cops, in the other there are seven. They act like planting evidence is normal police work for them. This is disgusting. I've said it once and I'll say it a million times, one bad apple spoils the bunch. This phrase doesn't just mean that there is one bad apple, it means that one bad apple makes all of the goddamned apples bad, and this is the exact case we see in our police forces today.

The Baltimore PD has been dealing with issues for years, so much so that a 2016 US Department of Justice investigation uncovered widespread abuse in the department, saying:

“Racially disparate impact is present at every stage of [the Baltimore Police Department]’s enforcement actions, from the initial decision to stop individuals on Baltimore streets to searches, arrests, and uses of force. These racial disparities, along with evidence suggesting intentional discrimination, erode the community trust that is critical to effective policing.”

That DOJ investigation was prompted by the Freddy Gray case where 25-year-old Gray dies in April of 2015 after sustaining a spinal cord injury in police custody after being thrown into the back of a police van without a seatbelt, as required by department regulations. Every single one of the officers in that case either had their charges dropped or they were acquitted. 

The only thing that can be done with a bunch of rotten apples is to dump them. We need to dump government police forces and replace them with private organizations that are paid for directly from who the consumer should be, not politicians but you and me. Organizations like the Detroit Threat Management Center and other private security groups proves that it can happen. As a matter of a fact, there are more people employed in private security today than there are in government police forces. The problem is that the government wants to keep their monopoly on force as much as possible. My answer to that is Smash the State.

Until next time... keep striking the root!

 

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