I had no idea how far back the history of asset forfeiture goes. Find out all about it in this episode. Also, What's in the News with stories on private disaster relief efforts, cops getting off with murder, Motel 6 is a bootlicker, kindergartner suspended for imagination, and Maine nullifying federal food laws. I also discuss a new contest I'm running that you can win, and a new podcast project I've released for Pax Libertas Productions that you don't want to miss. This episode is brought to you by Tom Woods's Liberty Classroom, helping you to become a smarter and more informed libertarian than ever before, for just 24 cents a day.

WHAT’S RUSTLING MY JIMMIES

[1:36]

One thing I talk a lot about on this show is government theft. Taxation is theft, but so is forfeiture, both civil and criminal. I didn't realize how far back the history of asset forfeiture went until I found an article in the book I Must Speak Out: The Best of The Voluntaryist that was selected and edited by Carl Watner. There is a link to the free ebook version of this book in the show notes to this episode at thelavaflow.com/71.

I found this book while doing research for my latest podcast project called Essential Libertarianism, which I'll be talking about a bit later in this episode. The article in the book is titled “‘Sweat Them at Law with Their Own Money': Forfeitures and Taxes in American History” and it goes into detail on the history of this evil perpetrated by our government. 

WHAT'S IN THE NEWS

[10:12]

In private disaster relief news, there have been numerous accounts of private groups working to help with the disasters created by the various hurricanes we've seen recently, from the Cajun Navy to the Liberty Coalition for Disaster Relief, a group of anarchists working to crowdfund disaster relief and volunteer coordination. Check out their Facebook group. They are a great organization showing “Without government, who would help people in need?” The link is in the show notes to this episode.

On this topic, several cruise companies sent ships to the Caribbean following some of these hurricanes, lending their massive ships to the relief effort, transporting provisions and picking up stranded tourists. 

Interestingly enough, FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, uses a private company as a benchmark for how things are on the ground during a disaster.  It's called the Waffle House Index and it's a three-color rating that uses green to denote that the local Waffle House restaurant is fully open, yellow for if it's just serving a limited menu (suggesting that it can't get the supplies it needs), and red for closed (a very rare occurrence for the 24-hour chain).

In screw the government news, mere hours after Hurricane Irma, Miami-Dade County was ticketing residents for building code violations on their wrecked properties.

In we investigated ourselves news, the US Department of Justice has decided they will not charge six Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray. The Department of Justice has been investigating the case since 2015, when Gray, a 25-year-old, black Baltimore resident, died of injuries he sustained while in police custody.

In boot licking companies news, two Motel 6 locations in Phoenix, Arizona are routinely sending in leads to immigration agents when they suspect guests of being undocumented. While an investigation by the Phoenix New Times was unable to get confirmation from Motel 6 headquarters, employees at the motels in question said that collaboration with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is standard practice: “We send a report every morning to ICE—all the names of everybody that comes in,” a front-desk clerk told the New Times.

But this isn't anything new for Motel 6. In 2015, the ACLU released a statement of other nationwide collaboration with police and the government.

In government indoctrination centers news, a 5-year-old imaginative boy’s parents are speaking out after they say their son was suspended from school for telling a teacher that he had a bomb in his backpack.

In nullification news, Maine Governor Paul LePage signed a Food Sovereignty Bill into law, guaranteeing the rights of Maine towns to regulate food production locally, rather than submitting to federal regulation.

Don't miss signing up for the new October The LAVA Flow contest by signing up at http://thelavaflow.com/email.

PAX LIBERTAS PRODUCTIONS TRAILER

[26:04]

I have a new podcast project that just released over the weekend and I think you will want to check it out. It's called Essential Libertarianism and you can get it wherever you get your podcasts including iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play and many others. Check it out at EssentialLibertarianism.com.

Essential Libertarianism IS voluntaryism, and that is the basis for this show. A few months ago I picked up an old book from the early 80's called Neither Bullets Nor Ballots: Essays on Voluntaryism by Carl Watner, George H. Smith, and Wendy McElroy. After reading this book, I had a much better understanding of voluntaryism as a whole and it renewed my commitment to this philosophy. I began digging down the rabbit hole of content at Voluntaryist.com, the website for Carl Watner and The Voluntaryist newsletter which has been publishing continually since 1982, which led me to reach out to him about this project. He agreed to let me do it and he is excited about it as well!

 

Read Full Transcript

TEASER INTRO

I had no idea how far back the history of asset forfeiture goes. Find out all about it in this episode. Also, What's in the News with stories on private disaster relief efforts, cops getting off with murder, Motel 6 is a bootlicker, kindergartner suspended for imagination, and Maine nullifying federal food laws. I also discuss a new contest I'm running that you can win, and a new podcast project I've released for Pax Libertas Productions that you don't want to miss. This episode is brought to you by Tom Woods's Liberty Classroom, helping you to become a smarter and more informed libertarian than ever before, for just 24 cents a day.

INTRO 

“Welcome to The LAVA Flow, channeling the flow of information to the Libertarian, Anarcho-capitalist, Voluntaryist, and Agorist community. Find us at thelavaflow.com. Here’s your host, Rodger Paxton.”

Thank you for joining me this week, home of The Treaty of Portsmouth formally that ended the Russo-Japanese War of 1904–05, this is the show that will bring you the people, places, and events that everyone in the liberty revolution needs to know. You can catch me on Twitter @TheLAVAFlowPod.

This is episode seventy-one, History of Asset Forfeiture, and it's Tuesday, September 26th, 2017, when there have already been more than 881 people killed by police this year. What's Rustling My Jimmies this week? You're about to find out! Let’s Do It To It!

WHAT’S RUSTLING MY JIMMIES

One thing I talk a lot about on this show is government theft. Taxation is theft, but so is forfeiture, both civil and criminal. I didn't realize how far back the history of asset forfeiture went until I found an article in the book I Must Speak Out: The Best of The Voluntaryist that was selected and edited by Carl Watner. There is a link to the free ebook version of this book in the show notes to this episode at thelavaflow.com/71.

I found this book while doing research for my latest podcast project called Essential Libertarianism, which I'll be talking about a bit later in this episode. The article in the book is titled "'Sweat Them at Law with Their Own Money': Forfeitures and Taxes in American History" and it goes into detail on the history of this evil perpetrated by our government. 

America essential got it's forfeiture laws from England, where they started nearly half a millennia ago in 1540 with a trade act under Henry VIII that provided for forfeiture of good carried in English owned vessels that had foreign shipmasters, so there was a bit of nationalism involved in this. Another act passed in 1564 allowed for informers of these English ships with foreign shipmasters to receive a share of the penalties of these sorts of forfeitures. This is a recurring theme in forfeiture laws both in England and America.

In the mid-1600's, England because even more nationalistic with their shipping by passing more Navigation Acts that required "the carrying of trade between ports in the British Empire" be limited to "English ships."  If an illegal ship were caught carrying trade in the British Empire, "the penalty was forfeiture of all their goods," and if you were an informer, you received one-third of the value of the offending ship and the cargo, which would be a huge sum back then.

And, of course, England needed a new bureaucracy to deal with these laws, so they created an office of "Survey, Collecter, and Receiver of the Moneys and Forfeitures Payable by the Act." Another crime that allowed for forfeiture was if the master of the ship failed to make a complete and accurate accounting of its cargo.

Interestingly enough, these laws were written so that if someone was accused, the burden of proof was with them to show that the seizure was illegal. Sound familiar? England even came up with a fascinating new name for smuggling; they called it "stealing the King's customs." This implied that the king owned the products and labor or others.

Fast forward to the American colonies when Virginia in 1623 set price control measures that included a forfeiture and confiscation feature. The law said, "upon paine of forfeiture and confiscation of all such money and Tobacco received or due for commodities so sold (contrary to the aforesaid orders) the one-half to the informer, the other half to the State." If the buyer of price-controlled goods didn't report his purchase to the Governor or Counsel of State within ten days, they would lose their goods to forfeiture. 

In Boston in 1696, the lawmakers provided that those violating the laws of public market be subject to forfeiture of their goods, and that informers be paid rewards. A typical law provided that any "fish, beef, or pork packed and sold without a Gager's [official inspector] mark shall be forfeited by the seller, the one-half to the informer and the other half to the country."

The Sugar Act of 1764 and the Stamp Act of 1765 brought their own forfeiture as well. 

Under the Sugar Act, if a seizure was made at sea, one-half the value went to the crew of the vessel making the seizure. Offenses under both acts were triable in newly established courts of admiralty. These and similar other provisions found in the Sugar Act and the Revenue Act of 1767 formed the basis for the legal plundering of American commerce. 

The writers of the Declaration of Independence had many issues with these various acts passed by the English parliament against the colonies, but they apparently had no issues with the forfeitures since this wasn't mentioned as one of the objections in the document.

The rebellious colonists did not oppose the use of seizures and forfeitures, they only objected to their use against themselves.  In fact, three weeks after the Declaration of Independence, the Continental Congress proposed a law making all property of those siding with the King subject to seizure. During the early years of the Revolutionary War, virtually every state enacted laws confiscating the holdings of people loyal to the Crown. 

Even the founders of this country found forfeitures to be just for activities they disagreed with. As far as is known based on writings of the time, not a single American patriot took exception to forfeitures or seizures by themselves.

On July 31, 1789, less than 5 months after the first meeting of Congress, they passed legislation to "regulate the Collection of the Duties imposed by law on the tonnage of ship or vessels, and on goods, wares, and merchandises imported into the United States." Many portions of this law dealt with forfeitures and seizures for things as egregious and evil as if the goods had no customs permit, the goods weren't invoiced, if the goods were concealed, etc. Goods and the ships that carried them that met these conditions were sold at public auction and proceeds were split between the US Treasury, the informer, and the customs agents. These laws also applied to goods brought into the US by land, providing the forfeiture of carriages, horses, and oxen that helped move the goods. The laws that eventually lead to the Whiskey Rebellion were based on these laws.

One of the earliest recorded court cases contesting a forfeiture was registered as "The United States v 1960 Bags of Coffee" in 1814. Does that sound familiar, too? It should. This is very similar to the names of the court cases you hear about today when money is forfeited, such as "The United States v $124,700 in US Currency" in 2006. This is seen throughout the history of the United States. Cases such as "The United State v. Two Horses" in 1878, "The United States v. Two Bay Mules, etc." in 1888, and "The United States v One Black Horse, et. al." in 1904 were all related to not paying federal excise taxes on the transportation of liquor.

Another early landmark case went before the US Supreme Court in January 1827. The owner of the ship "The Palmyra," was challenging the forfeiture of his ship without him being convicted of a crime first. The court held that no criminal conviction was necessary for forfeiture to happen.  All civil forfeitures begin with the arrest or seizure of the offending property. On the other hand, a criminal forfeiture cannot commence until the defendant has been convicted in a criminal proceeding.

With the outbreak of the Civil War, Congress found a new way to apply forfeiture and seizure laws. 

The first Union confiscation law was passed on July 15, 1861 (Statutes at Large, XII, 319) and provided for the confiscation of property, including slaves actually employed in the aid of the insurrection. The second confiscation law, passed in mid-1862, was titled An Act to Suppress Insurrection, to punish Treason and Rebellion, to seize and confiscate the Property of Rebels, and for other Purposes (Statutes at Large, XII, 589). It provided for seizure and forfeiture of two different categories of property. First,  property belonging to officers, whether civil, military, or naval of the Confederate government or any of the rebel states, and of citizens of loyal states giving aid or comfort to the rebellion was declared seizable at once without qualification. Second, other people in any part of the United States who aided the rebellion were to be warned by public proclamation and given sixty days in which to return their allegiance to the federal government. If they failed to do so, their property was to be confiscated.

Something very similar to this happened that gave the US Government Arlington National Cemetary. Robert E. Lee's property, Arlington, was seized during the war for failure to pay taxes that were directed specifically at southern real estate in areas of the South controlled by northern armies. The tax on Arlington was $92.07.

Once Arlington was seized, the tax commissioner bid $26,800 on part of the estate for the federal government, which is the part that became Arlington National Cemetary. 

Supreme Court Justice Joseph P. Bradley said in Boyd v. United States in 1886:

[S]eizures have been authorized by our own revenue acts from the commencement of government. The first statute passed by Congress to regulate the collection of duties, the act of July 31, 1789, 1 Stat. 29, 43 contains provisions to this effect. As this act was passed by the same Congress which proposed for adoption the original amendments to the Constitution, it is clear that the members of that body did not regard searches and seizures of this kind as "unreasonable," and they are not embraced within the prohibition of the amendment. 

As you can see, the United States government has never met a forfeiture they didn't like, and it goes all the way back to the beginning of the country. If you think any serious change is going to happen to these laws, then I have some ocean front property in Arizona to sell you, before it's seized for not paying the ocean view tax on it. 

WHAT'S IN THE NEWS

In private disaster relief news, there have been numerous accounts of private groups working to help with the disasters created by the various hurricanes we've seen recently, from the Cajun Navy to the Liberty Coalition for Disaster Relief, a group of anarchists working to crowdfund disaster relief and volunteer coordination. Check out their Facebook group. They are a great organization showing "Without government, who would help people in need?" The link is in the show notes to this episode.

On this topic, several cruise companies sent ships to the Caribbean following some of these hurricanes, lending their massive ships to the relief effort, transporting provisions and picking up stranded tourists. 

Royal Caribbean’s ships, several of which are sailing empty due to storm-induced cancellations, are fully stocked and staffed, Bayley said. Those resources will instead be used to aid in relief efforts across ports in the Caribbean that were badly hit by Irma.

The Majesty of the Seas, which can fit 2,767 guests at maximum occupancy, is sailing to St. Thomas and St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands to drop off water, ice, food and other provisions on Tuesday. The ship will offer meals to first responders before sailing with displaced tourists to San Juan, Puerto Rico, where the airport is operational and where travelers can catch flights home. Other ships have similar missions, including ships from Norwegian Cruise Line and Carnival Cruise Line. 

Interestingly enough, FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, uses a private company as a benchmark for how things are on the ground during a disaster.  It's called the Waffle House Index and it's a three-color rating that uses green to denote that the local Waffle House restaurant is fully open, yellow for if it's just serving a limited menu (suggesting that it can't get the supplies it needs), and red for closed (a very rare occurrence for the 24-hour chain).

But why would a powerful government agency rely on a business known for the funny words it has for hash-brown toppings? Because that business knows disaster. Waffle House locations are primarily in the American South, where tornadoes and hurricanes are a common occurrence. For the business to survive these disasters—not to mention help customers survive them—it has to have a rock-solid plan in place. And it does.

In a blog post for FEMA, Waffle House CEO Walt Ehmer noted some of the ways Waffle House responds when disaster strikes, including actually sending the board of directors to the affected location so they can make decisions on the ground. That's why if a Waffle House is closed, you know the situation is dire.

In fuck the government news, mere hours after Hurricane Irma, Miami-Dade County was ticketing residents for building code violations on their wrecked properties.

Celso Perez was helping his neighbors remove some fallen trees blocking their street when a county code enforcer rolled up and issued him a safety notice for having a downed fence. "I laughed," Perez told WSVN-TV. "I thought he was kidding. 'You are kidding, right? We just had a hurricane six hours ago.'"

It wasn't a joke. The official told Perez that the downed fence—which encloses a pool—was a safety hazard, and that if it wasn't fixed by the time he returned, Perez would be hit with a fine. The official then hung the safety citation on the portion of Perez's fence that remained standing, leaving him and his neighbors to finish clearing the debris from their street.

According to WSVN, the county has handed out 680 safety notices for downed pool barriers, and another 177 electrical hazard safety notices.

Even if he could, it's quite possible that Perez and the other people handed citations might have more pressing things to do right after a hurricane than bring their homes back up to code. You know: clearing the streets, seeking medical attention, checking in on family members, trying to find food. You might think the county would have higher priorities too, like getting the lights back on for Miami-Dade's 16,510 homes and businesses that were still without power at the time of the article.

These safety notices appear to be just warnings, meaning no fines have been handed out as of yet, but, these warnings carry with them a duty to correct the violation within a specific window of time. Presumably, if these warnings are not heeded, this will be followed up with a fine. 

As Perez said of the day he got his ticket, "All the stores were closed. It's not like I can go to Home Depot and find some temporary barrier."

In we investigated ourselves news, the US Department of Justice has decided they will not charge six Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray. The Department of Justice has been investigating the case since 2015, when Gray, a 25-year-old, black Baltimore resident, died of injuries he sustained while in police custody.

After being confronted by law enforcement and arrested for having a switchblade knife, Gray was placed in the back of a police van. At some point in the ride, Gray fell over, hitting his head, breaking his neck, and damaging his spinal cord — injuries that led to his death.

The DOJ began looking into the case in 2015, at the behest of Baltimore authorities. But two-and-a-half years later, the DOJ says it could find no evidence that Gray's civil rights were violated during the arrest, and while officer conduct might have been reckless — they make no judgment on the subject — none of the officers had the "specific intent" required for the DOJ to press charges.

So, the intent is required for charges against police, but if my reckless actions led to the death of someone I would have charges against me, more often than not. This just proves the case even more that there is a completely separate set of rules for our rules than for us, the ruled.

________________

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In boot licking companies news, two Motel 6 locations in Phoenix, Arizona are routinely sending in leads to immigration agents when they suspect guests of being undocumented. While an investigation by the Phoenix New Times was unable to get confirmation from Motel 6 headquarters, employees at the motels in question said that collaboration with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is standard practice: "We send a report every morning to ICE—all the names of everybody that comes in," a front-desk clerk told the New Times.

"Every morning at about 5 o'clock, we do the audit and we push a button and it sends it to ICE." What's more, court documents show that "between February and August, ICE agents made at least 20 arrests at Motel 6s, showing up roughly every two weeks" while there was a distinct lack of "records indicating that ICE conducted arrests at other local motels during this same time period."

In 2015, the Supreme Court ruled that hotels do not have to comply with warrantless police requests to hand over guest information, so if Motel 6 is in fact routinely handing over guest information without a warrant, they're not doing so under legal threat of punishment.

These two locations are corporate owned hotels, not franchised. Motel 6 released a statement saying "This was implemented at the local level without the knowledge of senior management. When we became aware of it last week, it was discontinued."

But this isn't anything new for Motel 6. In 2015, the ACLU released a statement of other nationwide collaboration with police and the government.

A Phoenix-based attorney, Robert McWirter, told the New Times, "I'll tell you one goddamned thing for sure - I'm not staying at a Motel 6 from now on." Hear hear. Nor will I.

In government indoctrination centers news, a 5-year-old imaginative boy’s parents are speaking out after they say their son was suspended from school for telling a teacher that he had a bomb in his backpack.

Jackson Riley allegedly made the claim at Great Valley Charter School in Modesto, California late last month after he refused to take his backpack off when asked, explaining that by doing so may cause the “bomb” to explode, his father, Ian Riley, said. 

After the teacher checked his backpack ― presumably for explosives ― the child’s father was called to come get him from school. Jackson was suspended for one day, and his permanent record was marked with the claim that he made “terrorist threats to school officials."

Initially, the school accused Jackson of having “intentionally engaged in harassment, threats or intimidation,” according to the school’s letter. But since that code violation can only pertain to fourth through 12th graders, Jackson later received an amended letter in his file that accused him of having “made terrorist threats to school officials,” Riley said.

Jackson's mother, Michelle Riley, said, "He said he couldn’t take his backpack off because it would explode, meaning he doesn’t want anybody to get hurt, so I mean, granted, it’s all in the world of pretend-play, and we’re talking about an imaginary bomb. But where was the threat? We still haven’t really received a clear answer to that.”

In a statement to Fox 40 News, the school said they cannot discuss the specific case but that they take “student safety and discipline very seriously.”

Welcome to the no-intelligence no-tolerance policy of government indoctrination centers.

In nullification news, Maine Governor Paul LePage signed a Food Sovereignty Bill into law, guaranteeing the rights of Maine towns to regulate food production locally, rather than submitting to federal regulation.

The movement for food sovereignty in Maine began in the town of Sedgwick, which passed its own food sovereignty bill, and the idea quickly spread to twenty towns across the state. The Sedwick law explicitly gave citizens of the town the right to “produce, process, sell, purchase, and consume local foods of their choosing,” such as raw milk and meats slaughtered locally in plants that do not meet the burdensome federal regulations that create barriers of entry for smaller operations.

Decentralizing measures regarding food regulation are not isolated to Maine. Two years ago, Wyoming passed a law protecting the right of the citizens to sell unlicensed “homemade” food without fear of prosecution. The Wyoming law is not as sweeping as the Maine Food Sovereignty Laws, but it similarly represents the increased willingness of states to nullify federal regulations regarding food. Maine, however, is the first state to pass a law aimed broadly at all food regulations, rather than a single specific regulation.

The food sovereignty movement is undoubtedly a response to the increasingly burdensome regulations on small food producers. The response from Maine farmers who support the bill indicates that the movement is a reaction to the costs imposed on small producers by federal regulations. Jordan Pike, a farmer from Lebanon, Maine, said of the law:

Providing this service to community members and neighbors can mean the difference between keeping the cow — even keeping the farm — or having to sell out. It means being able to pay the vet bill for an animal instead of putting it down, or pay the roofer to fix the leak in the barn, or the painter and keep our property values up.

The law is set to take effect on November 1, but the governor has called for a special session of the state government before then to address the objections of the federal government. The USDA has threatened to “designate” the Maine Meat and Poultry Inspection if the new law is not amended to exempt the slaughtering of meat and poultry from protection under the new law. To have “designation status” means that any meat or poultry slaughtered in the state would be required by federal law to “be transferred to the Federal meat and poultry inspection program overseen by the USDA-Food Safety and Inspection Service.”

It is no surprise that the federal government is unwilling to relinquish any regulatory power back to the state and local governments of the country, and if Maine chooses to fight back and uphold the nullification of federal regulations, then the Department of Agriculture will be in a position to use the might of the federal government to force the state to submit. As it stands, Governor LePage is encouraging the state government to meet federal demands. Hopefully, the legislature will choose otherwise and the Food Sovereignty movement will spread to the rest of the country.

In some personal news, I am running a new contest through the month of October, starting today. I have a new email list set up where I can communicate with you guys about new episodes, new bonus content, share things with you guys, or anything else I could think of. I don't plan on sending a bunch of emails, just a handful each month, but it is a great way to stay in contact.

To sign up for the contest, all you have to do is go to thelavaflow.com/email and sign up. It really is that simple. Anyone signed up for this by the end of October will be entered to win the prize. The grand prize pack will include an exclusive The LAVA Flow Contest Winner t-shirt, a The LAVA Flow tote bag, one of my favorite libertarian books signed by the author, and a signed copy of the Liberty Force Comic #1 produced by Johnny Adams of the Johnny Rocket Launch Pad. There will only be one grand prize issued, but there will be 4 other prizes for randomly drawn contestants that will include a signed copy of the Liberty Force Comic #1. So, you have five chances to win this time!

So, make sure to get in on this today so you don't miss out! Sign up at thelavaflow.com/email now for your chance to win!

In some more personal news, I have some new bonus content for the supporters of The LAVA Flow. I am a part of the League of Liberty, which also includes Marc Clair from Lions of Liberty, Chris Spangle from We are Libertarians, and Johnny Adams from Johnny Rocket Launch Pad. We recorded our first of our kinda-monthly supporters only content last week and I will be posting it up in the next couple of days for all of my supporters to hear. You can get this content by supporting any of our shows, but, of course, I would prefer if you support my show because, frankly, it is infinitely better than those other guys. You can support The LAVA Flow at http://thelavaflow.com/support. 

Our conversation scraped the bottom of the barrel of crassness a few times, so if that isn't your thing you may want to skip this one. 

We talked about a lot of stuff in this hour and a half. Find out why We are Libertarians was the genesis of The LAVA Flow Podcast! What are the superpowers of each of the members of the League of Liberty? We talked about our thoughts on the Libertarian Party and Nicholas Sarwark and his shenanigans lately. Is political action effective for the Libertarian Party? Is the political process a waste of time for libertarians? Is the Libertarian Socialist Caucus a real thing and what are our thoughts on it? Are any of the hosts members of their state and/or the national Libertarian Parties? Find out about all of the new projects the members of the League have coming out and find out if there are segments of each show that have never been released. Trust me, you don't want to miss this.

We have a Facebook group for all of you guys to join us in conversation. There is a link to the group in the show notes to this episode or you can search League of Liberty Podcast on Facebook for it. 

PAX LIBERTAS PRODUCTIONS TRAILER

I have a new podcast project that just released over the weekend and I think you will want to check it out. It's called Essential Libertarianism and you can get it wherever you get your podcasts including iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play and many others. Check it out at EssentialLibertarianism.com.

Essential Libertarianism IS voluntaryism, and that is the basis for this show. A few months ago I picked up an old book from the early 80's called Neither Bullets Nor Ballots: Essays on Voluntaryism by Carl Watner, George H. Smith, and Wendy McElroy. After reading this book, I had a much better understanding of voluntaryism as a whole and it renewed my commitment to this philosophy. I began digging down the rabbit hole of content at Voluntaryist.com, the website for Carl Watner and The Voluntaryist newsletter which has been publishing continually since 1982, which led me to reach out to him about this project. He agreed to let me do it and he is excited about it as well!

I know how it is, it is tough to read so much libertarian material on the web. That is why I wanted to turn the fantastic content from Voluntaryist.com into easily digestible, audio form content through an RSS feed, and here it is. I started with the full book of Neither Bullets Nor Ballots in five episodes of the show and will be releasing new content every week from various articles on the site, starting with several articles on the fundamentals of voluntaryism. Guys, this is great content that you don't want to miss. Make sure to subscribe at EssentialLibertarianism.com today.

Here is the short trailer for the show. I hope you enjoy it!

OUTRO

Thank you for listening to the show this week. As always, I need to thank my favorite bag hoarder, Jessica, for her help with this show. For the show notes to this episode, where I put links and other information that has been on this show, go to thelavaflow.com/71.

I have two new iTunes review this week.

Kayli45 said:

I thought Madrox from The Madrox Deprogram had the sexiest voice in the Liberty movement, but Rodger might make me have to rethink that.

Wow, Kayli! I've never heard of Madrox but to call my voice sexy.... Yum! Thanks!

And Huckleberry Stuart said:

Real News! Mr. Paxton delivers the important news stories from a true libertarian perspective, based on rock solid principles. His voice alone is worth tuning in! My only issue with this podcast is that it does not air every day. Thank you for your work and dedication.

Thanks, Stuart. I'm almost to the point where I can bring you more content. Become a supporter today and help me get there!

Remember, iTunes helps to steer people to this podcast based on ratings and reviews, so please go to thelavaflow.com/itunes and leave me a rating and a review. All the cool kids are doing it. Thank you to everyone who has left me a rating and a review so far. You guys rock!  To all of you who haven't, can you guys help me out and go leave a review for me? Go to thelavaflow.com/itunes to do that now.

I have one new supporter of the show this week. Dan H. pledged $2.50 per episode using Patreon. Thanks so much for helping me get closer to my next level, Dan! You rock! Dan, you and all the rest of my awesome supporters will get access to the bonus League of Liberty episodes that I will be posting every month or so. Enjoy!

Thanks to Dan and all of my awesome supporters, I am now at $230 per episode or 92% of the way towards my next goal of $250. Only $20 per episode away, guys! When I hit this next goal I will be bringing you a full episode of The LAVA Flow every single week instead of every other week. I know you want more content from me and I want to give it to you, so add your pledge today to help me bring you twice the LAVA Flow that you're getting today.

If you, like Dan, want more of the LAVA Flow, exercise your free-market muscles by going to http://thelavaflow.com/support and giving a per-episode donation of as little as a buck an episode using Federal Reserve Notes through Patreon or Bitcoin through Coinbase. I want to be able to bring you more content soon, so make sure to add your donation today to help make that happen!

Until next time... keep striking the root.

This has been a Pax Libertas Productions Podcast.

 

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