In this fortnight's episode, The Radicals for the Free Market Edition, we talk about capitalism versus the free market, What's in the News with stories on libertarians who've lost their minds, kids being deradicalized, cannabis as medicine, and policing for profit, and an Ancap Apps segment on Arcade City.

WHAT'S RUSTLING MY JIMMIES 

[1:32]

Should we be radicals for capitalism, or radicals for the free market? I dissect these two ideas and determine which one libertarians should champion.

WHAT'S IN THE NEWS 

[8:39]

In across the pond news, a 4-year-old boy in England who mispronounced the word “cucumber” as “cooker bomb” was recommended for a de-radicalization program.

In libertarians have lost their damn minds news, Loyola University economics professor and libertarian theorist and author, Walter Block, announced the formation of Libertarians for Trump, a group supporting the election of Donald Trump for president.

In slippery slope news, New Jersey Assemblywoman Pamela Lampitt introduced legislation that would criminalize walking while using a non-hands-free-phone.

In getting married without government news, the Alabama senate passed a bill that would abolish marriage licenses in that state.

In cannabis news, the US Supreme Court refused to hear a case brought to it by the states of Oklahoma and Nebraska to stop Colorado's legal marijuana law.

In cannabis is medicine news, an experimental cannabis-based drug has successfully treated children with a rare form of severe epilepsy in a keenly anticipated clinical trial.

In cannabis legalization news, New Orleans police will have even more leeway to issue citations for simple marijuana possession after the City Council voted 7-0 to enact new standards aimed at reducing the number of arrests for low-level drug crime.

In policing for profit news, the New Hampshire House passed a bill requiring a criminal conviction before prosecutors could proceed with asset forfeiture. Under the proposed law, prosecutors would also have to prove by clear and convincing evidence that the property was derived from, or used in, the commission of a crime. Under current law, the state can seize assets even if a person is never found guilty of a crime, or even arrested.

In more Apple news, The FBI filed a motion to vacate it's scheduled court hearing and showdown over its demands that Apple help unlock a terrorist’s iPhone. The motion also indicates that the FBI may have found a way onto the phone without Apple’s help.

In Libertarian Party Presidential news, Steve Kerbel has dropped out and endorsed Gary Johnson.

Also, a new national presidential poll shows that Gary Johnson is galvanizing double-digit support in a potential multi-candidate presidential field that would include former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and billionaire businessman Donald Trump.

In Free State Project news, the FSP announced that it has joined a class action lawsuit against the IRS for illegally targeting conservative nonprofit organizations seeking tax-exempt status.

ANCAP APPS

[24:49]

We've talked about Uber and Lyft. Now it's time to talk about their successor, Arcade City, a new app that is determined to bring decentralization to the transportation market.

 

Read Full Transcript

TEASER INTRO

In this fortnight's episode, we talk about capitalism versus the free market, What's in the News with stories on libertarians who've lost their minds, kids being deradialized, cannabis as medicine, and policing for profit, and an Ancap Apps segment on Arcade City.

INTRO

“Welcome to The LAVA Flow, channeling the flow of information to the Libertarian, Anarcho-capitalist, Voluntaryist, and Agorist community. Find us at thelavaflow.com. Here’s your host, Rodger Paxton.”

Thank you for joining me this week. coming to you from the only state in America where the parks system is completely funded by user fees instead of appropriated funds from the state budget, this is the show that will bring you the people, places, and events that everyone in the liberty revolution needs to know. You can catch me on Twitter @TheLAVAFlowPod.

This is episode thirty-three, The Radicals for the Free Market Edition, and it’s Tuesday, March 29th, 2016, the day before my 40th birthday, and when we had more than 257 people killed by police already this year. What's Rustling My Jimmies this week? You're about to find out! Let’s Do It To It!

WHAT’S RUSTLING MY JIMMIES

A few years ago, I used to call myself a Radical for Capitalism. I took the term from Ayn Rand in her book, Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, but I haven't used that term in a while, and there is a very good reason I stopped using it. I have still called myself a capitalist for some time, though, because I believed it to be true, although now I'm not so sure.

It is hard to call myself a capitalist when everyone believes we currently live in a capitalist society. I have, for years, told people we don't live in a true capitalist society. But do we? I believe that we do have capitalism currently today, which is one reason I've chosen to stop calling myself a capitalist at all. Let me explain.

Capitalism has a very simple definition. It is, according to Merriam Webster, "a way of organizing an economy so that the things that are used to make and transport products (such as land, oil, factories, ships, etc.) are owned by individual people and companies rather than by the government." Basically, the means of production are owned by private individuals or groups of individuals and not the government.

Under that definition, we do currently live in a capitalist society. It may be crony-capitalism, where there is heavy regulation and favorable government intervention based on close relationships between business people and government officials and politicians, but it is still capitalism based on the literal definition of capitalism, since the means of production are privately owned. No matter how much it sickens us, we have to admit that yes, we do live in a capitalist society, and, as libertarians, we cannot call ourselves capitalists or radicals for capitalism because of the huge amount of regulation and cronyism in our current system.

So this leaves us with being radicals for the free-market, or free-marketeers. Ignore the fact that that sounds an awful lot like three musketeers, and let's consider this for a minute. As Judge Andrew Napolitano said, "a free market operates under capitalist principles, but capitalism does not necessarily require, or, as we know even prefer, a truly free-market." This fits with the definition of capitalism that we just talked about. We do live in a capitalist society now, where the means of production are owned by individual people rather than by the government. But, we most certainly do not live in a free-market society.

What is a free market? Again, we turn to Merriam Webster. It is "an economic market or system in which prices are based on competition among private businesses and not controlled by a government." To put it simply, it is a system where everyone is freely able to sell or buy whatever goods and services they want whenever they want with prices determined exclusively by supply and demand, without any government intervention. This is the model we as libertarians want. This is the model we should be touting as our ideal, not capitalism.

As the Judge said, while capitalism can survive without a free-market, a free-market cannot survive without capitalism. A free market does require private ownership of the means of production. But capitalism does allow for government intervention, the opposite of a free-market. These terms are not interchangeable.

Why is this important? It's important, primarily, because people understand that what we currently have is capitalism, and that it is a completely unfair system based on how much money politicians are given by lobbyists, or whose buddy is currently sitting in office. If libertarians continue going around saying we want capitalism, then people will, rightly so, be confused and think we are calling for more of what we already have. I don't care if you follow it up with the incorrect statement that we don't currently live in a true capitalist society, people will still not understand exactly what we mean. This is why using the correct terms is so important.

Crony capitalism has been with us for a long time. In America, it started with Congress's very first act in 1789 with a tariff on foreign goods to protect influential business interests, and has only grown exponentially since then. We have, basically, never had a completely free-market in the United States, except on grey and black markets in the form of agorism, which is something we all take part in without even paying attention. If you have ever paid an the neighbor kid in cash to come mow your yard or shovel your driveway or wash your car, you have participated in the free-market. If you've bought fruit or vegetables at a market stand, you've participated in free-market enterprise. Here in New Hampshire, we have very regular Community Market Days in several cities around the state where goods are bought and sold completely outside of government interference. At the last one we had in Portsmouth, I bought a cup of coffee, a bowl of stew, a cook book, home made soap and lip balm, an awesome wooden box, a 3D printed anarchy A symbol in yellow, and several other items. I used mostly bitcoin, but also a little bit of cash, to buy all of these items. The government knew nothing about it, nor will they. It was all completely voluntary exchanges and was an excellent experience for both buyers and sellers. Keeping the government out of our voluntary transactions is just as important as keeping the government out of our wallets and our bedrooms.

So, I urge all of you to participate in the free market as much as you can. And, I would also urge you to stop using the term capitalism as an ideal that we strive for. This is no different than using words like "fiscally conservative and socially liberal." It is wrong, period. I talked about what's wrong with fiscally conservative and socially liberal back in episode 8 of this show, which you can listen to at thelavaflow.com/8. If we continue to define what we believe incorrectly, there is no way we will get people on board. Words are important, especially when talking about emotionally charged topics like capitalism. I plan to work hard to replace the work capitalism with the words free market from now on when I'm describing our ideal economic system. I hope you join me.

WHAT'S IN THE NEWS

In across the pond news, a 4-year-old boy in England who mispronounced the word "cucumber" as "cooker bomb" was recommended for a de-radicalization program. Not only did he have the gall to mispronounce the word cucumber, he also drew a stick figure of a man cutting that vegetable with a giant knife. God forbid!

This happened back in November, but the mother was so upset about this that she is just now coming forward about it. And who wouldn't be upset? You're told your child should be deradicalized because of a drawing of a man cutting a vegetable and a mispronounced word? Give me a fucking break. This is what happens in a zero-tolerance society. Logic and discernment go out the window and you have children being suspended for drawing a cartoon bomb. This shit has got to stop. Until it does, I beg you... for the sake of all that is holy and righteous... take your children out of government indoctrination centers.

In libertarians have lost their damn minds news, Loyola University economics professor and libertarian theorist and author, Walter Block, announced the formation of Libertarians for Trump, a group supporting the election of Donald Trump for president. Block says he created the group to mobilize the "massive support for Donald Trump within the libertarian community."

I would love to see what this massive support for Trump from libertarians is. I've only heard of one libertarian supporting Trump before this, and that was Christopher Cantwell, who lost his damn mind long ago.

Block's argument is:

The Donald is the most congruent with our perspective. This is true, mainly because of foreign policy. And, of the three, foreign policy, economic policy and personal liberties, the former is the most important. As Murray Rothbard and Bob Higgs have demonstrated over and over again, US foreign policy determines what occurs in economics and in the field of personal liberties. Foreign policy is the dog that wags the other two tails.

Hell, if we are looking for someone who is great on foreign policy yet sucks on economic policy and personal liberties, why not just elect Kim Jong-un? Talk about someone who is a non-interventionalist! Give me a break. I've read lots of Block's stuff, and he is a brilliant libertarian, but he is way off base on this one.

In slippery slope news, New Jersey Assemblywoman Pamela Lampitt introduced legislation that would criminalize walking while using a non-hands-free-phone. The fines for this would be up to $50 and up to 15 days in jail.

"If a person on the road, whether walking or driving, presents a risk to others on the road, there should be a law in place to dissuade and penalize risky behavior," Lampitt said.

First they came after using a phone in a theater. Then they came after using a phone in a car. Then they came for using a phone while walking.

In getting married without government news, the Alabama senate passed a bill that would abolish marriage licenses in that state. If passed into law, this bill would essentially remove the state from the business of marriage completely.

The bill reads "all requirements to obtain a marriage license by the State of Alabama are hereby abolished and repealed. The requirement of a ceremony of marriage to solemnized the marriage is abolished.”

Senator Greg Albritton introduced the bill saying “When you invite the state into those matters of personal or religious import, it creates difficulties. Go back long, long ago in a galaxy far, far away. Early twentieth century, if you go back and look and try to find marriage licenses for your grandparents or great grandparents, you won’t find it. What you will find instead is where people have come in and recorded when a marriage has occurred.”

This bill would accomplish two things.

First, it would effectively render void the edicts of federal judges that have overturned state laws defining marriage. The founding generation never envisioned unelected judges issuing ex cathedra pronouncements regarding the definition of social institutions like marriage and the Constitution delegates the federal judiciary no authority to meddle in the issue. Constitutionally, marriage is an issue left to the state and the people.

Second, the bill would limit the sates role in defining and regulating marriage, ending the squabble between factions seeking to harness the power of the state. This would remove the burden from government officials torn between the legal requirements of their jobs and their personal religious convictions. Since the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage, a number of Alabama probate judges have refused to issue marriage licenses due to their religious beliefs.

By limiting the states role in marriage. SB143 would allow Alabamians to structure their personal relationships as they see fit without interference from the government or other people.

“Licenses are used as a way to stop people from doing things,” said Michael Boldin of the Tenth Amendment Center. “My personal relationship should not be subject to government permission.”

I said before that if my state ever did this, I would divorce my wife according to the state and remarry her without the state. Anything I can do to have less government in my life, the better.

In cannabis news, the US Supreme Court refused to hear a case brought to it by the states of Oklahoma and Nebraska to stop Colorado's legal marijuana law.

Oklahoma and Nebraska asked the Supreme Court to hear a challenge to Colorado's marijuana legalization framework, saying that the state's legalization regime was causing marijuana to flow across the borders into their own states, creating law enforcement headaches. But by a 6-2 majority, the Supreme Court declined to hear the case, without comment.

Observers on both sides of the issue point out that the court's majority did not issue any explanation of their dismissal, which is standard practice in cases like this. The justices may have objected to the lawsuit on its merits, or they may have simply felt that it wasn't proper for them to take up the case at this time, preferring instead to let the state-level legalization experiments play out.

Legalization advocates say that while the decision likely won't have any big practical effects in the near-term, it does send a signal to other states mulling their own marijuana policy in the coming years. "The Supreme Court’s rejection of this misguided effort to undo cautious and effective state-level regulation of marijuana is excellent news for the many other states looking to adopt similar reforms in 2016 and beyond," said Tamar Todd, director of the office of legal affairs at the Drug Policy Alliance, in a statement.

In cannabis is medicine news, an experimental cannabis-based drug has successfully treated children with a rare form of severe epilepsy in a keenly anticipated clinical trial. GW Pharmaceuticals said the 120-patient trial showed patients taking Epidiolex achieved a median reduction in monthly convulsive seizures of 39 percent compared with a reduction on placebo of 13 percent.

"This shows that cannabinoids can produce compelling and clinical important data and represent a highly promising new class of medications, hopefully in a range of conditions," Chief Executive Justin Gover told Reuters.

In light of the positive data, Gover said GW would now request a meeting with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss its plans to seek regulatory approval for treating this particular form of epilepsy.

There are currently no FDA-approved therapies for Dravet syndrome.

In cannabis legalization news, New Orleans police will have even more leeway to issue citations for simple marijuana possession after the City Council voted 7-0 to enact new standards aimed at reducing the number of arrests for low-level drug crime.

Local law already allowed NOPD officers to write a ticket for first-offense possession, and they still have the option to use the stricter state law that calls for arrests. Council members Susan Guidry and Jason Williams backed the ordinance that allows police to issue summonses for third and subsequent simple possession charges.

The new law doesn't make it legal to smoke marijuana in New Orleans; it only lessens the penalties for possession of small amounts. Fines would start at $40 for a first offense and be capped at $100 for fourth offenses and beyond. Cases would be tried in Municipal Court, as opposed being handled as state cases in Orleans Criminal District Court.

In policing for profit news, the New Hampshire House passed a bill requiring a criminal conviction before prosecutors could proceed with asset forfeiture. Under the proposed law, prosecutors would also have to prove by clear and convincing evidence that the property was derived from, or used in, the commission of a crime. Under current law, the state can seize assets even if a person is never found guilty of a crime, or even arrested.

HB636 would also direct all asset forfeiture proceeds into the state general fund instead of law enforcement budgets. This would minimize the policing for profit incentives inherent in the current system.

A loophole remains in HB636 that would allow state and local law enforcement to pass off forfeiture cases to the feds, thereby bypassing more stringent state law. But despite the loophole, sources close to the Tenth Amendment Center in New Hampshire call this a foundational first step, and the federal loophole is on their radar to address in 2017 if HB636 ultimately passes into law.

New Hampshire. It really is like this.

In more Apple news, The FBI filed a motion to vacate it's scheduled court hearing and showdown over its demands that Apple help unlock a terrorist’s iPhone. The motion also indicates that the FBI may have found a way onto the phone without Apple’s help.

“On Sunday, March 20, 2016, an outside party demonstrated to the FBI a possible method for unlocking [shooter Syed] Farook’s iPhone,” the motion says. “Testing is required to determine whether it is a viable method that will not compromise data on Farook’s iPhone. If the method is viable, it should eliminate the need for the assistance from Apple Inc. (“Apple”)"

In the meantime, this is a landmark win on many fronts, starting with those who advocate for privacy and against surveillance, and for technology companies, many of which sided with Apple and surely had some anxiety about the possible outcome of tomorrow’s scheduled hearing. “We live in a golden age of surveillance,” an attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation said. Everything that we do online is available to law enforcement all of the time. Encryption is going to give people back their privacy in small amounts, some of the time. [Law enforcement] doesn’t like that. Encryption makes things difficult for them.”

And making things difficult for our rulers is a good thing.

In Libertarian Party Presidential news, Steve Kerbel has dropped out and endorsed Gary Johnson. Kerbel seemed to be quite a bit more on the radical side than Johnson, so I'm pretty surprised he endorsed Johnson.

Applauding Kerbel’s campaign and his work on behalf of the Liberty movement, Johnson said, “The Libertarian Party’s nomination process should be — and is — a competitive and open one. Steve Kerbel has been a serious, dedicated candidate, and is a valuable advocate for the principles we share. I sincerely appreciate Steve’s support, and look forward to working with him to achieve our mutual goal: A Libertarian campaign for President that will take full advantage of the historic opportunity 2016 presents.”

In announcing his decision, Kerbel said, “I believe that our efforts have advanced the cause of Liberty, and that was my goal in entering this campaign 1 year ago. Kerbel also praised Gov. Gary Johnson as ” the only candidate running for President who can unify the liberty movement.” He further stated that Johnson’s “leadership is what is needed at this important point for our party and for the country.”

Also, a new national presidential poll shows that Gary Johnson is galvanizing double-digit support in a potential multi-candidate presidential field that would include former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and billionaire businessman Donald Trump. Johnson is polling 11 percent in the Monmouth University poll released on March 24, 2016, in a potential three-way presidential race.

According to the poll, Johnson drew support from both Republicans and Democrats.

Calling the poll results a sign of significant potential for his third-party run, Johnson, in a press statement, said, “2016 could very well be the year when American voters recognize that there are more than just two choices for President. The fact that we are in double digits before the general election campaign has even begun is a strong signal that voters are finally ready to challenge the premise that their President must be either a Republican or a Democrat. Polls across the board are showing that the real plurality of American voters are independent, and are clearly not comfortable with either the likely Republican or Democrat nominee. The door is open for a credible advocate of smaller government and greater freedom.”

In Free State Project news, the FSP announced that it has joined a class action lawsuit against the IRS for illegally targeting conservative nonprofit organizations seeking tax-exempt status. We talked about this illegal targeting on this show before, but now it appears it is much deeper than just targeting conservatives, now that the FSP was listed in an IRS list of organizations it unfairly targeted. It seems the IRS targeted anyone who they may have disagreed with.

This list came about because the US Court of Appeals forced the IRS to turn over its list. The IRS tried for almost a year to not have to comply with the court's order to release this list, but their last appeal was denied. US District Judge Susan J. Dlott said that the IRS is "just running around in circles and not answering the questions. … My impression is the government probably did something wrong in this case. … I question whether or not the Department of Justice is doing justice."

I will continue to follow up on this case and let you know of any developments.

ANCAP APPS

On this show, we've talked about Uber a couple of times. First, I did a How to Live LAVA in a Statist Society segment way back in episode 3 on Uber and Lyft. I also did a What's Rustling My Jimmies on the Free Uber campaign here in New Hampshire back in episode 24. It's time to talk Uber again, but in a different frame of mind.

Back in January, Uber cut fares in more than 100 cities, also slashing compensation to its drivers by up to 45%. This left many Uber drivers scrambling to make ends meet on as low as $2.87 per hour. This caused many Uber drivers to rebel, and caused the man behind the machine of Free Uber in Portsmouth to fight back by competing.

Christopher David, the founder of Free Uber, took it upon himself to create a brand new app, being dubbed as "the Uber killer" by many in media, called Arcade City. It started as a small, simple ride-share idea for the New Year's celebrations, and has blown up into a ride-sharing app that is already in over 100 cities across 28 states in the country. It is also in Australia, and is growing by the day.

Arcade City is blowing up, because it's different. It's built on the Ethereum blockchain to be a completely decentralized app that is, in Chris's words, "building the logistics network for the decentralized future." He is going after the peer-to-peer connection itself. He wants to "facilitate that connection to facilitate that transaction, then get out of the way, kind of like a city, where peer-to-peer transactions are characterized not by friction, but by fun, with gamification and points and prizes. A fun city that is rewarding on many levels. That is Arcade City."

When Chris set up to create this app, he expected to get a couple of hundred drivers to start. He ended up with more 1000 in the first week and more than 3000 in a matter of a few weeks. How? Because he promised them they could keep 100% of the money for the rides that they give, or, they can use the Arcade City app to facilitate the transaction and pay only 10% of the ride to Arcade City, much less than Uber and Lyft charge. But, keep in mind, if the rider pays in cash, or if the driver has his own means of accepting credit cards or cryptocurrency, the driver keeps it all. Arcade City will also use Ethereum to issue 'crypto-equity' to drivers, allowing them to own up to 100% of the company by 2020. This is certainly revolutionary.

But, what's even more revolutionary is the idea of "pay what it's worth model." This is not mandatory for the drivers as they are free to set their own rates and offer additional services like deliveries or roadside assistance. However, approximately half of current drivers give rides on a 'pay what you think is fair' basis. As Chris David said, "the Achilles' heel of Uber and Lyft is their centralized management of pricing. By decentralizing that decision to the level of the driver and rider, Arcade City frees the driver to be an entrepreneur, and empowers the rider with control over their entire experience. Both drivers and riders are loving it so far."

And, similar to Uber and Lyft, there is a strong reputation system built into the system. Want to drive for Uber in an older, beat up car? Too bad! Want to drive for Arcade City? You can, and the market will sort it out. Once the reputation gets out that you're in a crappy car, then the prices your able to charge as the driver of that car will show it. And, if you want to get a super cheap ride somewhere at the fraction of the cost of a cab, pick a lower ranked driver with an older car and get a break on your price. But, it also works the other way. Do you have a nice car, are a super nice guy, and give a drink to every rider? Awesome! You're reputation will show that, and you should be able to charge a bit of a premium price. It's all possible with Arcade City.

And, it's also great for the rider. They can set their own fares, hail or schedule a ride in advance, choose their own driver, and, if they find a driver they love, they can keep going back to that same driver over and over instead of ending up with some random driver and not knowing what to expect. They also have many more options for payment. Don't have a credit or debit card? Use cash. Are you trying to live on bitcoin? Pay with cryptocurrency. Don't have money? Find a driver that will do a barter deal for whatever you two can agree on. More flexibility is good for both the driver and the rider.

And, right now, Arcade City is looking for investors for a seed round of $2 million to take the company even further. As an investor, you get on the ground floor of this incredible opportunity, and, you will even get free Arcade City rides for life!

To learn more about Arcade City, and to sign up as a driver or a rider, go to Arcade.City. The app is available on both iPhones and Android devices. Give them a try.

OUTRO

Thank you for listening to the show this week. As always, I need to thank my favorite bag hoarder, Jessica, for her help with this show. For the show notes to this episode, where I put links and other information that has been on this show, go to thelavaflow.com/33.

I have a favor to ask of all of you. If you have a Facebook account, please like The LAVA Flow page. You can find it at thelavaflow.com/fb. Thanks so much!

I have several new iTunes review this week!

TSPerson says:

One of The Best! I try to listen to several libertarian themed podcasts weekly but, this is the only one I’ll never miss. Thank you for the content.

Arcologist says:

A sane take on the news! If you’re tired of hearing crazies on the left and right battle it out, try the LAVA Flow. It’s refreshingly clear-eyed and independent. You’ll hear perspectives you might never have heard before.

Emceemcee says:

Great Podcast! The LAVA Flow podcast is entertaining, informative, and well produced. I listen to each episode as soon as it’s released.

Thanks so much, guys. I appreciate all of the kind words.

Now, it's your turn to give me an iTunes review. iTunes steers people to this podcast based on the number of subscribers and the number of positive reviews, so every review you give me helps the show. Go o thelavaflow.com/itunes today to give me a rating and a review. Thanks!

I also have a new supporter this week. David pledged $2.50 using federal reserve notes through Patreon. Thanks, David!

I had a supporter and friend ask me a question at one of the many liberty events we have here in New Hampshire last week. He asked if I preferred supporters to use Patreon or Bitcoin. Honestly, if I had my choice, I would choose bitcoin, because there are no fees when you support the show using bitcoin. Patreon is a business, and as such, has to charge a fee to stay in business, which I support completely. They charge 5% of the donations, plus any credit card processing fees. So, for my current Patreon supports who pledge $56 per episode right now, I get about $51 per episode after all of those fees. So, if at all possible, I would prefer supporters to use Bitcoin, but I will always have my Patreon account up, since most people use that. Please feel free to pledge using either, but if you have bitcoin, I prefer that.

And, if you, like David, want more of the LAVA Flow, and to keep this show ad free, exercise your free-market muscles by going to http://cae.563.myftpupload.com/support and giving a per-episode donation of as little as a buck an episode using Federal Reserve Notes through Patreon or Bitcoin through Coinbase. There are monthly costs associated with doing this show and I need additional equipment to continue making this show better for you every single episode. I'm now at a total of $74.50 per episode. Wow! Thanks so much for you support!

Until next time... keep striking the root.

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