Yahoo screwed you over and didn't even have the courtesy to tell you about it. Should you drop Yahoo like a hot potato? What' in the News with a Spurt update,  Defense Distributed, America being sued, police misconduct, taxing vape shops, World War III, and more, and a Statists Gonna State on the “OG libertarian.” And be sure to hang out until the end of the show to find out if you won our September contest!

WHAT’S RUSTLING MY JIMMIES [1:32]

Yahoo has not had a good couple of weeks lately, and the news is even worse for their customers. Reuters reported that Yahoo, at the behest of US intelligence organizations, secretly built a custom software program to search all of its customer's incoming emails for specific information. What that specific information included has not been revealed, but the fact that Yahoo was asked, and complied with, the request to scan 100% of its customer's incoming email is damning.

Three former employees and a fourth person apprised of the events have said the request came either from the National Security Agency or the Federal Bureau of Investigation. This is the first known case of an email company agreeing to search all arriving messages.

WHAT'S IN THE NEWS [9:03]

In Spurt update news, the DEA has delayed placing Kratom on the Schedule I list for now thanks to a few legislators.

In regulating the First Amendment news, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday against Defense Distributed, the Texas organization that promotes 3D-printed guns.

In suing Saudi Arabia news, in a vote of 97-1, the US Senate overrode Obama's veto of the bill that would allow families of 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia.

And now it's being reported that Iraq plans to use this bull to demand compensation for the US invasion of Iraq.

In police misconduct news, police officers across the country misuse confidential law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons that have nothing to do with daily police work, an Associated Press investigation has found.

In no government needed news, Spain has gone without an elected national government for over 290 days, and many Spaniards think this is a wonderful thing. I agree!

In taxation is theft and death to business news,  Pennsylvania's new tax on e-cig shops is forcing them out of business.

In World War III news, the U.S. suspended diplomatic contacts with Russia over Syria, while Moscow halted cooperation on a joint program for disposal of weapons-grade plutonium.

This coming on the heels of a report that a nationwide TV service run by Russia's Ministry of Defence said last week, “‘Schizophrenics from America are sharpening nuclear weapons for Moscow.”

And, Open Whisper Systems, maker of Signal encryption, which I've recommended on this show before, have revealed details about a subpoena they received requiring them to provide information about two Signal users for a federal grand jury investigation.

STATISTS GONNA STATE [27:21]

Hopefully, this will be my last Statists Gonna State segment on Bill Weld. Thankfully, the election is now officially less than a month away! Praise Rothbard!

So what has Weld done to draw my ire this time? Well, he is still slobbering all over his old friend Hillary for one. On MSNBC, Weld was asked if Johnson were more qualified than Hillary Clinton to be president of the United States. His answer is just disgusting.

He thinks so highly of Clinton that he is using the Libertarian Party and his VP nomination to help her our every chance he gets, and he as much as admitted that to a reporter from The Boston Globe.

The article starts off saying, “The Libertarian vice presidential candidate, William F. Weld, said Tuesday that he plans to focus exclusively on blasting Donald Trump over the next five weeks, a strategic pivot aimed at denying Trump the White House and giving himself a key role in helping to rebuild the GOP.”

 

Read Full Transcript

TEASER INTRO

Yahoo screwed you over and didn't even have the courtesy to tell you about it. Should you drop Yahoo like a hot potato? What' in the News with a Spurt update, Defense Distributed, America being sued, police misconduct, taxing vape shops, World War III, and more, and a Statists Gonna State on the "OG libertarian." And be sure to hang out until the end of the show to find out if you won our September contest!

INTRO

“Welcome to The LAVA Flow, channeling the flow of information to the Libertarian, Anarcho-capitalist, Voluntaryist, and Agorist community. Find us at thelavaflow.com. Here’s your host, Rodger Paxton.”

Hippy-flipping libertarian philosophy straight to your brain every fortnight! Thank you for joining me this week, coming to you from the state that is the home of the oldest hiking trail in America, The Crawford Path, this is the show that will bring you the people, places, and events that everyone in the liberty revolution needs to know. You can catch me on Twitter @TheLAVAFlowPod.

This is episode forty-seven, The Yahoo Screwed You Edition, and it’s Tuesday, October 11th, 2016, when at least XXXXX people have been killed by police already this year. What's Rustling My Jimmies this week? You're about to find out! Let’s Do It To It!

WHAT’S RUSTLING MY JIMMIES

Yahoo has not had a good couple of weeks lately, and the news is even worse for their customers. Reuters reported that Yahoo, at the behest of US intelligence organizations, secretly built a custom software program to search all of its customer's incoming emails for specific information. What that specific information included has not been revealed, but the fact that Yahoo was asked, and complied with, the request to scan 100% of its customer's incoming email is damning.

Three former employees and a fourth person apprised of the events have said the request came either from the National Security Agency or the Federal Bureau of Investigation. This is the first known case of an email company agreeing to search all arriving messages.

Yahoo's response has been less than thrilling. They said, "Yahoo is a law-abiding company, and complies with the laws of the United States." I suppose Yahoo doesn't know that these sort of intelligence requests can, and should, be fought in court instead of just bowing down to the draconian US intelligence services. This just goes to show that Yahoo doesn't give two shits about the privacy of its customers.

Experts said it was likely that the NSA or FBI had approached other Internet companies with the same demand, since they evidently did not know what email accounts were being used by the target. The NSA usually makes requests for domestic surveillance through the FBI, so it is hard to know which agency is seeking the information.

Several other companies have released statements that they have never received a request like Yahoo apparently received. Facebook claims they have never received such an order, and said that if they did they would fight it. Apple and Twitter said the same. Google says that they have never received such a request and, if they did, they would say, "no way." Microsoft only said that they have never engaged in the sort of email scanning that Yahoo has, but refused to comment as to whether the company has ever received such a request. I would image that means they have received such a request in the past are under a gag order.

Patrick Toomey, a staff attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, said in a statement that “the order issued to Yahoo appears to be unprecedented and unconstitutional. The government appears to have compelled Yahoo to conduct precisely the type of general, suspicionless search that the Fourth Amendment was intended to prohibit. It is deeply disappointing that Yahoo declined to challenge this sweeping surveillance order, because customers are counting on technology companies to stand up to novel spying demands in court.”

The fact that every single Yahoo email account was subject to this surveillance seems at odds with figures in Yahoo’s transparency report, which claims fewer than 20,000 accounts were tapped at the behest of the U.S. government. It would also appear to run contrary to the spirit of two quotations on Yahoo’s transparency site, where Yahoo General Counsel Ron Bell claims, “We fight any requests that we deem unclear, improper, overbroad, or unlawful,” and Mayer says, “We’ve worked hard over the years to earn our users’ trust and we fight hard to preserve it.”

Interestingly enough, Yahoo had their email engineers write the program to do this without involving the company's security team in the process. That is a big concern for someone like me, who is the security officer for a company in a heavily regulated industry. Yahoo's security team apparently found the program withing weeks of its installation, and their initial thought was that hackers had broken in. Yahoo's Chief Information Security Officer Alex Stamos resigned his position with Yahoo when he found out that Yahoo's CEO Marissa Mayer. He also told his subordinates that he had been left out of a decision that hurt users' security and that hackers could have accessed the stored emails. Stamos is now the security officer for Facebook.

Which brings me to my next point. Just a few days before this news about Yahoo cooperating with US intelligence came out, Yahoo confirmed that data from at least 500 million user accounts had been stolen. The stolen information included names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords, and, in some cases, encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers. While these two incidents are not related, this breach was this year while the US intelligence request was in 2015, this is just more evidence that Yahoo is not a company that gives security it's full attention.

And let's not just stop at Yahoo. No company, when it comes down to it, cares more about your security than they do about pleasing the government regulators and investigators. This is why I've harped on this show so often about taking security into your own hands. There are enough tools out there today that makes this much easier than it was ten years ago, or even five years ago. With email encryption tools being more plentiful and easier to use than ever, if you're not using one right now, then you should be. PGP, or Pretty Good Privacy, is easier than ever to use, and if you use Google Mail, then you really should be using the easy plugin called Virtu Email Encryption that ties directly into your Gmail account making it super easy to encrypt your email for free.

I have been telling people contacting me through Facebook messenger to start contacting me using Signal or Wire instead, and I much prefer Wire at this point. Why? Not because I'm involved in nefarious dealings or because I have something to hide, but because I don't know what I may need to hide.

Look, when someone tells you they don't want to use encrypted communications because they have nothing to hide, tell them that they might as well say free speech is unimportant because they have nothing useful to say. Or tell them to put a webcam in their bathroom and bedroom if they have nothing to hide. Or tell them to give you all the passwords to their Facebook, email, etc, if they have nothing to hide.

Besides, with 27,000 pages of federal laws alone, not even counting the state laws and the laws of other countries you may be communicating with, you have no idea what the laws are. Hell, neither do the people writing and enforcing the laws for that matter. The fact is that you have no idea if you're breaking the law or not. For instance, did you know that it is a federal crime to be in possession of a lobster under a certain size? It doesn’t matter if you bought it at a grocery store, if someone else gave it to you, if it’s dead or alive, if you found it after it died of natural causes, or even if you killed it while acting in self-defense. You can go to jail because of a lobster. And that is only one of the thousands of silly laws you could be breaking right now and not even know it.

If the federal government had access to every email you’ve ever written and every phone call you’ve ever made, it’s almost certain that they could find something you’ve done which violates a provision in the 27,000 pages of federal statues or 10,000 administrative regulations. You probably do have something to hide, you just don’t know it yet. I'm not willing to take the chance and find out on the wrong end of a gun.

This is why I secure my communications every chance I get. I hope you will start doing the same. And, while you're at it, delete your Yahoo account today.

WHAT'S IN THE NEWS

In Spurt update news, the DEA has delayed placing Kratom on the Schedule I list for now thanks to a few legislators. Several US Senators and Representatives have asked the DEA to delay this “to allow both for a public comment period and sufficient time for the DEA to outline its evidentiary standards to the Congress regarding the justification for this proposed action.” The DEA has capitulated for now, although a DEA spokesperson said that the plan to place Kratom on the list "will come sooner rather than later."

Since the DEA's announcement that it would schedule Kratom on October 1st, kratom advocates and researchers have voiced concern that the botanical dietary supplement does indeed have legitimate medical uses, although not as an FDA-approved botanical drug. Most vocal on the scientific side have been researchers at Columbia University and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. The teams have independently and collaboratively published two papers on kratom-derived chemicals and their potentially beneficial constellation of complex actions on human opioid receptors.

The Senators closed the letter they sent to the DEA with a more encompassing view of the societal impact of drug policy:

Since 1980, our federal prison population has exploded by nearly 800 percent. This increase is a result of draconian drug policies that continue to place nonviolent drug offenders behind bars. We should not, in haste and without adequate opportunity for comment and analysis, place substances in categories that may be inconsistent with their medical value and potential for abuse.

I love that the Senators are using this argument. What we're going to immediately see after the scheduling of this drug is more people becoming criminals overnight for completely victimless crimes. The drug war will escalate and police agencies around the country will begin begging for more funding to open the new front in the drug war, the attack on the despicable kratom. Fuck the DEA in the neck.

In regulating the First Amendment news, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday against Defense Distributed, the Texas organization that promotes 3D-printed guns. In a 2-1 decision, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals was not persuaded that Defense Distributed’s right to free speech under the First Amendment outweighs national security concerns.

The majority concluded:

Ordinarily, of course, the protection of constitutional rights would be the highest public interest at issue in a case. That is not necessarily true here, however, because the State Department has asserted a very strong public interest in national defense and national security. Indeed, the State Department’s stated interest in preventing foreign nationals—including all manner of enemies of this country—from obtaining technical data on how to produce weapons and weapon parts is not merely tangentially related to national defense and national security; it lies squarely within that interest.

The lawsuit, Defense Distributed v. Department of State, centers on whether a website that publishes CAD files—which would enable foreigners outside the US to print a firearm—violates munitions export laws. Fearing a possible lawsuit by the State Department or prosecution by the government, Defense Distributed took the files down three years ago, but they have since reappeared on BitTorrent sites.

This case has chilling implications for the freedom of sharing information on the internet. Thankfully, one of the judges agrees. District Judge Edith Jones directly disagreed with her colleagues. In a scathing dissent, she called it an "irrational representation" of the export regulations. She also described the government’s actions as "pure content-based regulation."

She wrote:

In sum, it is not at all clear that the State Department has any concern for the First Amendment rights of the American public and press. Indeed, the State Department turns freedom of speech on its head by asserting, "The possibility that an Internet site could also be used to distribute the technical data domestically does not alter the analysis…." The Government bears the burden to show that its regulation is narrowly tailored to suit a compelling interest. It is not the public’s burden to prove their right to discuss lawful, non-classified, non-restricted technical data.

In suing Saudi Arabia news, in a vote of 97-1, the US Senate overrode Obama's veto of the bill that would allow families of 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia. The sole vote to sustain Obama's veto was cast by none other than Harry Reid. I'm surprised Reid could stop kissing Obama's ass long enough to take the time to vote.

The White House lashed out at the Senate vote, saying, "I would venture to say that this is the single most embarrassing thing that the Unites States Senate has done, possibly since 1983.

Obama believes that this bill will cause complications with some of our close partners, and he may be right. The Saudi government released a statement saying that the bill "is of great concern to the community of nations that object to the erosion of the principle of sovereign immunity, which has governed international relations for hundreds of years. The erosion of sovereign immunity will have a negative impact on all nations, including the United States."

And now it's being reported that Iraq plans to use this bull to demand compensation for the US invasion of Iraq. The lobbyist group Arab Project in Iraq now sees their opportunity to ask for compensation from the United States over violations by US forces following the invasion of Iraq that saw the toppling of late President Saddam Hussein in 2003, according to a report from Al-Arabiya News.

The group is pushing for “a full-fledged investigation over the killing of civilians targets, loss of properties and individuals who suffered torture and other mistreatments on the hand of US forces.”

So, the US may have to be held accountable for illegal wars and the killing of innocent people? What a shocker! As far as I'm concerned, this is a great by-product of the bill.

In police misconduct news, police officers across the country misuse confidential law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons that have nothing to do with daily police work, an Associated Press investigation has found.

Criminal history and driver databases give officers critical information about people they encounter on the job. But the AP's review shows how those systems also can be exploited by officers who, motivated by romantic quarrels, personal conflicts or voyeuristic curiosity, sidestep policies and sometimes the law by snooping. In the most egregious cases, officers have used information to stalk or harass, or have tampered with or sold records they obtained.

No single agency tracks how often the abuse happens nationwide, and record-keeping inconsistencies make it impossible to know how many violations occur. But the AP, through records requests to state agencies and big-city police departments, found law enforcement officers and employees who misused databases were fired, suspended or resigned more than 325 times between 2013 and 2015. They received reprimands, counseling or lesser discipline in more than 250 instances, the review found.

Unspecified discipline was imposed in more than 90 instances reviewed by AP. In many other cases, it wasn't clear from the records if punishment was given at all. The number of violations was surely far higher since records provided were spotty at best, and many cases go unnoticed.

Among those punished: an Ohio officer who pleaded guilty to stalking an ex-girlfriend and who looked up information on her; a Michigan officer who looked up home addresses of women he found attractive; and two Miami-Dade officers who ran checks on a journalist after he aired unflattering stories about the department. Violations frequently arise from romantic pursuits or domestic entanglements, including when a Denver officer became acquainted with a hospital employee during a sex-assault investigation, then searched out her phone number and called her at home. A Mancos, Colorado, marshal asked co-workers to run license plate checks for every white pickup truck they saw because his girlfriend was seeing a man who drove a white pickup, an investigative report shows. In Florida, a Polk County sheriff's deputy investigating a battery complaint ran driver's license information of a woman he met and then messaged her unsolicited through Facebook. Officers have sought information for purely personal purposes, including criminal records checks of co-workers at private businesses. A Phoenix officer ran searches on a neighbor during the course of a longstanding dispute. A North Olmsted, Ohio, officer pleaded guilty this year to searching for a female friend's landlord and showing up in the middle of the night to demand the return of money he said was owed her.

Talk about creepy as fuck. Do we really want some of the types of people who are drawn to police work to have access to intimate details of our lives? Of course not. While not all people drawn to police work have this sort of mentality, enough of them do that should require that this sort of information be compartmentalized.

In no government needed news, Spain has gone without an elected national government for over 290 days, and many Spaniards think this is a wonderful thing. I agree!

There have been two votes, and a third is possible in December, to elect a national government, but no party has won enough seats to form a government. "No government, no thieves," said Felix Pastor who, like many voters, is fed up with the corruption and scandals that tarnished the two previous governing parties.

Spain's leaders warned that having no government would mean chaos and deprivation. Instead, more than anything, the crisis seems to have offered a glimpse of life if politicians stepped out of the way. "Spain would be just fine if we got rid of most of the politicians and three-fourths of government employees, said Rafael Navarro.

The editor of a Spanish news website, Ignacio Escolar, said, "A lot of people said we would go to hell if we didn't form a government. But, we're still here."

While many essential services are still being run, such as trash pickup, police, public transportation, and others, this just shows that people can get along just fine without massive government encroachment into their daily lives and that many will actually do better. And, with less force in their lives to boot. Go figure.

In taxation is theft and death to business news, Pennsylvania's new tax on e-cig shops is forcing them out of business. The estimated 350 vape shops scatter across Pennsylvania are getting hit hard by the new 40 percent wholesale tax on all vaping equipment and supplies. The real kicker is that the same 40 percent tax applies not only to purchases made after October 1—the day the tax took effect—but also covers all inventory on store shelves on that date. That means a store with $100,000 worth of inventory—about what a small vape shop would carry—owes the state $40,000 as of Saturday.

"I knew immediately that I would have to close," says Chris Hughes, who has run the Fat Cat Vaping shop for three years. "It's ludicrous to think what was a viable business yesterday — by the stroke of a pen — is no longer a viable business today," Dave Norris, owner of the Blue Door vape shop said as he prepared to close down all three of his locations because of the tax.

The tax was passed in July as part of the 2016-17 state budget (taxes on packs of traditional cigarettes increased by $1 as well). It had support from both sides of the Republican-controlled legislature and was signed by Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf. The tax will raise an estimated $13 million.

Some aren't so sure about that. "I am 100 percent confident that 40 percent of nothing is nothing," says Jeff Wheeland, R-Lycoming. What he means is that the state shouldn't be banking on revenue from the vaping tax if the tax decimates the businesses expected to pay it.

The clock is now ticking. The wholesale tax took effect on October 1, but businesses have 90 days to remit tax revenue to the state treasury. That gives lawmakers until the first day of 2017 to repeal the tax—but with the election looming, the state legislature is scheduled to be in session for fewer than a dozen days between now and the end of the year.

"A pack of cigarettes is going to be more affordable," Dori Odosso, owner of Sweet Home Vapor said. "That's something that I don't ever want to hear someone say to me—that they are smoking cigarettes instead of vaping because they can't afford to switch."

So, there you have it folks, a government taxing an entire industry out of existence, all with the stroke of a pen by your rulers, taking the livelihoods from likely hundreds of people and making a product off the market in that area that was keeping thousands and thousands of people more healthy. Brilliant. Government can't do anything right.

In World War III news, the U.S. suspended diplomatic contacts with Russia over Syria, while Moscow halted cooperation on a joint program for disposal of weapons-grade plutonium. The U.S. move followed a threat last week from Secretary of State John Kerry after new Russian and Syrian attacks on the city of Aleppo. The State Department said Russia had not lived up to the terms of an agreement last month to restore the cease-fire and ensure sustained deliveries of humanitarian aid to besieged cities.

An airstrike last month hit a United Nations humanitarian aid convoy, killing 20 people. The United States has accused Russia of hitting the convoy, but both Russia and Syria deny it.

This coming on the heels of a report that a nationwide TV service run by Russia's Ministry of Defence said last week, "‘Schizophrenics from America are sharpening nuclear weapons for Moscow." Officials said on Friday that underground shelters had been built which could house 12 million people - enough for the entire population of Moscow.

Relations between the US and Russia haven't been this bad since I was a kid, and there is no sign of them getting better once Hillary "reset button" Clinton is elected. Maybe want to dust off your preparedness plan.

And, finally in an Ancap App update, I have a retraction to make from my last episode. I said that Wire, the encryption communications app, offered voice and video calls with up to 128 people. I was wrong. They have group chat up to 128 people, but voice is only for us to 10 and video is only 1 to 1 right now. Sorry about that. But, it is still an awesome program, and the more I use it, the more I love it!

And, Open Whisper Systems, maker of Signal encryption, which I've recommended on this show before, have revealed details about a subpoena they received requiring them to provide information about two Signal users for a federal grand jury investigation. Signal, in their release about this, said:

We've designed the Signal service to minimize the data we retain about Signal users, so the only information we can produce in response to a request like this is the date and time a user registered with Signal and the last date of a user's connectivity to the Signal service.

Notably, things we don't have stored include anything about a user's contacts (such as the contacts themselves, a hash of the contacts, any other derivative contact information), anything about a user's groups (such as how many groups a user is in, which groups a user is in, the membership lists of a user's groups), or any records of who a user has been communicating with.

All message contents are end to end encrypted, so we don't have that information either.

This was the first subpoena Open Wire Systems has ever received and they were successfully able to appeal the original gag order away with the help of the ACLU, which is why they're able to tell us about this. I bet that if your Facebook messages are requested, you won't hear anything from Facebook about it, and Yahoo sure isn't going to have your back. This is why I keep telling people to use products like Signal or Wire for their communications.

STATISTS GONNA STATE

Hopefully, this will be my last Statists Gonna State segment on Bill Weld. Thankfully, the election is now officially less than a month away! Praise Rothbard!

So what has Weld done to draw my ire this time? Well, he is still slobbering all over his old friend Hillary for one. On MSNBC, Weld was asked if Johnson were more qualified than Hillary Clinton to be president of the United States. His answer is just disgusting. Take a listen.

PLAY AUDIO

If by qualified you mean bombing brown people, losing thousands of classified emails, misplacing $6 billion as Secretary of State, not to mention 4 American lives in Benghazi, then sure, I could agree with Weld. Apparently, Weld has a different qualification for POTUS than I do. No surprise to me.

Earlier in the interview that I played you, Weld outlined why Johnson is prepared to be president, expressed criticism for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump while also mentioning that he thinks “very highly” of Clinton. Of course he does, they go way back. He thinks so highly of Clinton that he is using the Libertarian Party and his VP nomination to help her our every chance he gets, and he as much as admitted that to a reporter from The Boston Globe.

The article starts off saying, "The Libertarian vice presidential candidate, William F. Weld, said Tuesday that he plans to focus exclusively on blasting Donald Trump over the next five weeks, a strategic pivot aimed at denying Trump the White House and giving himself a key role in helping to rebuild the GOP."

Wait, what? The article goes on,

"Weld’s comments in a Globe interview mark a major shift in his mission since he pledged at the Libertarian convention in May that he would remain a Libertarian for life and would do all he could to help elect his running mate, Gary Johnson, the former Republican governor of New Mexico.

But things have changed. Johnson has committed several high-profile gaffes in recent weeks that revealed apparent weak spots in his foreign-policy knowledge. Meanwhile, Trump had seemed to be surging back into contention after he fell well behind in the polls in early August.

While Weld insisted he still supports Johnson, he said he is now interested primarily in blocking Trump from winning the presidency and then potentially working with longtime Republican leaders such as Mitt Romney and Haley Barbour to create a new path for the party after the election.

He insisted he was not abandoning Johnson, although he signaled that bolting from the Libertarian Party might be a possibility in the future.

“I’m certainly not going to drop them this year,” Weld said."

Wow, thanks for that, Bill! What an asshat. Weld wants to work to rebuild the GOP after using the LP for his own purposes? Sound familiar? It should. After both Bob Barr and Wayne Allyn Root were finished using the LP, they ditched and went back to the GOP. And it's not like this would be the first time Weld has done this to the LP either. He did it to the Libertarian Party of New York in 2006 after promising not to drop the LP if he didn't get the GOP fusion nomination for Governor. Guess what happened after Weld didn't get that GOP nomination? You guessed it. He dropped the LP like a hot potato and went back to work inside the GOP, until 15 days before the LP nomination this year. With friends like this, who needs enemies?

The article continues:

Weld’s comments seemed sure to reignite suspicions among Libertarians who have questioned his loyalty to the party and have accused him of using the ticket for his own political aims. But Weld’s decision to chart his own course appears to reflect the feeling among his aides, who have privately expressed dismay at Johnson’s flubs on national television, such as when Johnson could not come up with the name of a favorite foreign leader and when he said “What is Aleppo?” when asked about the besieged Syrian city.

Those missteps — in sharp contrast to Weld’s smoother command of foreign affairs — have created some tensions on the ticket. Adding to the conflict are the accolades Weld has recieved from national political commentators who have dubbed him the more substantial and serious candidate, while ridiculing Johnson as a lightweight.

“Unfortunately, if the ticket was flipped, they might have more success,” said Bob Durand, a Weld ally and former Democratic state senator who donated $1,000 to the Libertarian ticket.

At one point, Weld strategists researched Libertarian Party rules to see if it were possible for him to take over the top of the ticket. The rules state the vice presidential nominee automatically assumes the presidential spot if there is a vacancy. But Johnson, peeved at the suggestion, flatly rejected the idea.

Wow. So much for Weld's loyalty to Johnson and the LP. Frankly, liar or not, the best thing that can happen for the Libertarian Party or for libertarianism in general, is for Bill Weld to slime and slink his way back to the GOP like the snake in the grass he is. Good riddance. Less than a month, folks, then we can wash our hands of Weld forever!

Of course, Bill Weld has come out saying he was misquoted and never said some of these things. But, he's been proven to be a liar at least twice that we've talked about on this show, once to the LPNY in 2006 and once when he swore on a napkin after the LP convention that he wouldn't go after guns. I trust Bill Weld about as far as I can throw him down the toilet.

OUTRO

Thank you for listening to the show this week. As always, I need to thank my favorite leaf-peeping partner, Jessica, for her help with this show. For the show notes to this episode, where I put links and other information that has been on this show, go to thelavaflow.com/47.

I have a bunch of new iTunes reviews this week! ChefKevin05 had this to say:

Amazing Podcast! Rodger is not only principled and knowledgable, but his no nonsense, but still entertaining approach is refreshing.

Thanks, Kevin! I try very hard to stay as principled as possible.

Selectivestorm100 said:

What people crave! As the host of my own show, when I listen to other podcasts I want something different. The LAVA flow is crisp, witty, and bare bones. I'm not writing this review because I just want that nifty T-shirt, I am because this show rocks.

Thanks, Storm! Glad you crave my content. That's awesome!

Imatomcat had this to say:

Mytomcat says Great Show!!! The LAVA Flow with Rodger Paxton is a great podcast and resource for Libertarians, Anarcho-capitalists, Voluntarists & Agorists covering current news on issues of Liberty & Freedom and the bad actors assaulting our liberties. The LAVA Flow is smart & intelligent with great commentary that respects the listener and never wastes a moment of your time with useless banter. Rodger is a class act and I never miss this High Quality show!

Wow, Tom! That's some high praise! Thanks!

Riley_86 said:

A principled podcast on Liberty! As I've become more liberty minded, I have been looking for more liberty-oriented podcasts and was turned onto The Lava Flow podcast by Free Talk Live, and since then, I've been hooked. I cannot get enough! I highly recommend this podcast to long-time libertarians/anarchists or people new to the liberty movement.

Riley, thanks so much for that awesome review.

Dallas from BC had this to say:

Great Liberty Podcast! Very straight to the point libertarian podcast. Full of the information on the latest news from a liberty perspective.

Thanks, Dallas! My first review from our neighbors to the north.

And, finally, from friend and donor to the show, Duck Duck Grey Duck, otherwise known as Brian,

My favorite podcast hands down! It's quick, entertaining, and gives you the information you want to know in a brilliant manner. I've listened to a number of libertarian podcasts, but this is the only one I refuse to miss. I can't recommend this podcast highly enough. Give it a listen, you won't regret it. #PaxtonforPres2020

Thanks so much for the review, and your friendship and support, Brian.

And keep giving me those reviews, guys. iTunes steers people to this podcast based on the number of subscribers and the number of positive reviews, so every positive review you give me helps get the show in front of more people. Go to thelavaflow.com/itunes today to give me a rating and a review!

And, for the announcement you've all been waiting for, the winners of my September contest! The winner for the prize pack for all new iTuens reviews in September is, iamatomcat! Congrats, Tom. Or should I call you cat? The winner for all of my iTunes reviews prior to September is, Mark, the theist libertarian! Congrats! If one of these is your iTunes reviewer name, please send me an email to rodger@thelavaflow.com and I'll get your address and t-shirt size and get your prize pack sent out to you as soon as possible. Thanks to everyone who participated in this contest, and for those of you who couldn't, I'll be revealing my next contest details in the next episode of this show on October 25th. That contest will run from then until the end of November, and the prize pack will be the same, an exclusive The LAVA Flow t-shirt only for contest winners, a The LAVA Flow tote bag, and one of my favorite libertarian books signed by the author!

For the first time in 22 months I have some bad news. I've gone backwards a bit on my donations. I had one supporter stop their $10 a month donation and had another lower their per-episode donation, so I've dropped a little bit this month. I'm now at $126 per episode in donations, or 50.4% towards my next goal to bring you a 30-minute The LAVA Flow episode every week. I want to thank the donors who dropped very much for all of their support in the past. You guys are awesome! Thanks so much for believing in me and what I'm doing.

And, finally, if you want more of the LAVA Flow, and to keep this show ad-free, exercise your free-market muscles by going to http://thelavaflow.com/support and giving a per-episode donation of as little as a buck an episode using Federal Reserve Notes through Patreon or Bitcoin through Coinbase. There are monthly costs associated with doing this show and I need additional equipment to continue making this show better for you every single episode.

Until next time... keep striking the root.

This has been a Pax Libertas Productions Podcast.

 

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